What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Last Updated on May 10, 2021

Not only will you learn about Pentecost Sunday, but you’ll get a delicious and simple Pentecost Cookie recipe also! So keep reading, all the way to the end! 

Everyone seems to know and understand what Easter is, maybe not Ash Wednesday, Lent or Holy Week, but at least the secular version of Easter and Easter activities.

However, have you ever seen books or heard conversations about Pentecost Sunday and wondered what on earth it was? Why do we talk about it? What is the significance of Pentecost Sunday? I’d like to try to answer your questions and also give you an amazing Pentecost Sunday Cookie Recipe!

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

What is Pentecost Sunday?

Pentecost Sunday is a day celebrated by many Christians across the world. It has a deep meaning since it wholly commemorates the day the Holy Spirit fell upon the twelve disciples. This is basically seen as the “birth” of the church and, therefore, many people see it as a birthday celebration for the church in general.

 

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When is Pentecost Celebrated?

Since the Holy Spirit fell on the twelve disciples not long after the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, Pentecost is celebrated 50 days after Easter. The word “pentecost” is Greek for the “fiftieth day.” This is around the presumed time that the Holy Spirit fell on the disciples, effectively marking the beginning of the church. Therefore, Pentecost is celebrated on the seventh Sunday after Easter or 50 days after.

 

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What Happened on Pentecost Sunday?

What occurred on Pentecost Sunday can be found in Acts 2.

Acts 2:1-4 – When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.

Of course, there are far more details concerning what happened on this day but, in short, this is what occurred to birth the physical church. I urge you to read beyond the verses I shared above as you will learn more details about why that occurrence was so amazing and why we celebrate it.

 

 

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What’s the Significance of Pentecost?

As briefly stated, Pentecost Sunday was the day attributed to the physical birth of the church. For this reason, it is seen as a birthday celebration for the church and all its followers. The symbols attributed with this holiday are a flame, wind, and a dove. The colors attributed are red, yellow and orange. and color attributed along with this holiday are red, a flame, wind, and a dove.

These symbols come from what the verse states about “a violent wind” and “tongues of fire.” The Holy Spirit is symbolized in the dove. Parishioners usually wear red on Pentecost Sunday and Priests will wear red vestments. There are special prayers that are set aside just for Pentecost also.

Jewish people also utilize this holiday to celebrate the end of Passover. Passover is when the ten plagues were brought to Pharaoh and his land. The last plague was the death of the first-born unless blood was placed above and around the doors of homes. Those who placed the blood were passed over and not touched by the final plague.

Pentecost Sunday is celebrated as the day Moses was given the laws not long after the plagues occurred. However, Catholics and many other Christian groups use Pentecost to celebrate the birth of the physical church.

 

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What is the Feast of Weeks in the Bible?

Pentecost Sunday is known under multiple names across various cultures. You may also find that it is referred to as different names throughout the Bible. I will list a few below; although, you might run into a few more. Just remember all of the names will largely stem from the explanations I have listed below.

Feast of Weeks – This name simply comes from the fact that this feast and celebration comes exactly seven weeks after the resurrection (Easter).

Feast of 50 Days – This name also derives from the timing of the feast and celebration.

Whitsunday – This is an English name for Pentecost Sunday which actually means “White Sunday.” If you read further in Acts chapter 2, you will see that around 3,000 people were baptized that day and the white signifies the robes they wore when being baptized.

The Feast of Harvest – Around the timing of this feast is when people would bring in the first harvest from their crops. This feast commemorates the fact that God provides not only a wonderful harvest concerning food, but also of bringing in new believers. The day the disciples received the Holy Spirit, they brought in (or harvested) so many souls for Christ and this was seen as a type of “first fruits.” This is largely because of the connection to the timing of the actual first harvest and its correlation with God’s provisions.

The Day of First-Fruits – This is simply a name that stems from the same meaning as The Feast of Harvest.

Pentecost Sunday is a wonderful day to fellowship over wonderful food and to celebrate the beginning of the church. Many of those who celebrate have special recipes that they save for this time of the year. A lot of these recipes center around the color of fire or the symbols I previously mentioned. I wanted to share a cookie recipe I like to use for my own Pentecost Sunday celebrations.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Pentecost Sunday + Pentecost Sunday Cookies

Makes – 80

Ingredients

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Cookies

Frosting

Instructions

Cookies

Sift together the all-purpose flour and baking powder. Keep aside

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

In a separate bowl, cream the butter and sugar till light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Add the egg and vanilla extract and beat it till smooth.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Gradually add the sifted flour and fold in.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Chill the cookie dough for 30 minutes.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Generously flour the working surface.

Divide the dough into two equal halves. Roll one half into a large circle with a thickness of ¼ inch.

Using a leaf cookie cutter, cut out as many leaves as possible. The leaves will make it look like fire believe it or not. If your cookie cutter has a leaf stem, I just cut that part out. Re roll the dough and cut more leaves. We got 40 leaves for each dough half.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Place the cookies in a parchment lined cookie sheet and chill for another 30 minutes.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Preheat the oven to 350 F.

Bake the chilled cookies for 10 minutes will slightly golden at the edges.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Let them cool completely before frosting.

Repeat the same process with the remaining half of the dough.

Frosting

Place the sifted confectioners’ sugar in a large bowl. Add the milk and vanilla extract and whisk it till smooth.

Divide the frosting into 3 bowls.

For the Red frosting – add 4 drops of red food coloring into the bowl and mix well.

Now for the Orange frosting – add 1 drop of red food coloring and 8 drops of yellow food coloring into the bowl and mix well.

Then for the Yellow frosting – add 6 drops of yellow food coloring into the bowl and mix well.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

To frost the cookies – using a butter knife, spread 3 stripes of each color on the cookies, starting with red on the thickest end, then orange and then yellow frosting on the tapering end. 

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Using a toothpick, blend each layer into the other, while giving it a fire effect.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Let the frosting dry for 10 minutes.

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

Serve immediately or store in an airtight container.

Notes

  • Instead of using vanilla extract, you can use almond extract or lemon extract to change the flavors.
  • Use the same extract in the cookies and the frosting.
  • The frosting dries quite quickly, so work quickly when blending the layers.
  • Do not use a lot of frosting for each layer or it will bleed into each other and become a humongous mess with dull orange frosting, covering the entire cookie. Instead of 3 distinct layers. 

What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!

 

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What Is Pentecost Sunday Plus Pentecost Sunday Cookies

Pentecost Sunday Cookies

Celebrating Pentecost? These cookies are the perfect treat for Pentecost Sunday!

Ingredients

  • Cookies-
  • 1½ cups of All-purpose Flour
  • 1 tsp of Baking Powder
  • ½ cup (1 sticks) of Unsalted Butter, softened
  • 1 cup of Sugar
  • 1 large Egg
  • 1 teaspoon of Vanilla Extract

Frosting

  • 2 cups of Confectioners Sugar
  • 4 teaspoon of Milk
  • 1 teaspoon of Vanilla Extract
  • Red and Yellow Food Colors

Instructions

Cookies

  1. Sift together the all-purpose flour, baking powder. Keep aside
  2. In a separate bowl, cream the butter and sugar till light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add the egg and vanilla extract and beat it till smooth.
  4. Gradually add the sifted flour and fold in.
  5. Chill the cookie dough for 30 minutes.
  6. Generously flour the working surface. 
  7. Divide the dough into two equal halves. Roll one half into a large circle with a thickness of ¼ inch.
  8. Using a leaf cookie cutter, cut out as many leaves as possible. Re roll the dough and cut more leaves. We got 40 leaves for each dough half. 
  9. Place the cookies in a parchment lined cookie sheet and chill for another 30 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 350 F.
  11. Bake the chilled cookies for 10 minutes will slightly golden at the edges.
  12. Let them cool completely before frosting.
  13. Repeat he same process with the remaining half of the dough.

Frosting

  1. Place the shifted confectioners’ sugar in a large bowl. Add the milk and vanilla extract and whisk it till smooth.
  2. Divide the frosting into 3 bowls.
  3. For the Red frosting - add 4 drops of red food coloring into the bowl and mix well.
  4. For the Orange frosting - add 1 drops of red food coloring and 8 drops of yellow food coloring into the bowl and mix well.
  5. For the Yellow frosting - add 6 drops of yellow food coloring into the bowl and mix well.
  6. To frost the cookies – using a butter knife, spread 3 stipes of each color on the cookies, starting with red on the thickest end, then orange and then yellow frosting on the tapering end.
  7. Using a toothpick, blend each layer into the other, while giving it a fire effect.
  8. Let the frosting dry for 10 minutes.
  9. Serve immediately or store in an airtight container.

2 thoughts on “What Is Pentecost Sunday? + Pentecost Cookie Recipe!”

  1. Hey Laura, I love these cookies for Pentecost this weekend. Hoping to make these for one of family craft for Pentecost Sunday will let you know how we get on. Take care. Blessings Rev. Cora

  2. Hi ‘Methodist Mom’! Happy to say I tried this idea to celebrate Pentecost with my family over here in Australia today. They worked really well! (I did use a slightly different recipe for the bikkies though – sorry ?) Anyway, thank you for the inspiration! They look fabulous and were, I thought, a fitting way to commemorate the day ?.

    Blessings,

    Meaghan.

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